COP27 Participants Blasted with Air Conditioning in 80 Degree Egypt
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COP27 Participants Blasted with Air Conditioning in 80 Degree Egypt

COP27 Participants Blasted with Air Conditioning in 80 Degree Egypt

Despite many green agenda-loving bigwigs pushing for countries to ration the use of heating and cooling to save energy, the COP27 conference is reportedly blasting its elite attendees with air conditioning in 80-degree Egyptian heat. Despite sweltering temperatures in Egypt, there is said to be very little sweating going on at the COP27 climate conference, with green agenda officials attending the event reportedly being blasted with air conditioning while pushing for more to be done about carbon emissions.

The energy use of temperature control technology has been a hot topic in Europe in recent months, with authorities in the likes of Italy and Germany having implemented various rationing measures on how much certain buildings can be heated or cooled over gas shortage fears. However, while others have also pushed such rationing with reference to climate change, no such restrictions appear to be in place in Egypt, with German publication Bild reporting that attendees of COP27 are being kept quite cool by air conditioning at the conference. In fact, despite outside temperatures in the area often reaching up to 27 degrees Celsius (~80 degrees Fahrenheit) in the early days of November, journalists for the publication describe some people resorting to wearing scarves inside the conference in order to keep warm. Despite air conditioning reportedly being blasted into the COP27 conference rooms, many in attendance — especially from Europe — have been keen to ration their population’s use of such equipment to reduce their energy footprints. For example, Italy banned most public and government buildings from being cooled below 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) back in April of this year, justifying the move as necessary in the face of the gas crisis caused by the ongoing war in Ukraine. A similar restriction has now been implemented by the country on heating, with both Germany and the European Union also rationing the use of central heating in a variety of public buildings. Germany in particular has implemented extremely strict rules, banning the heating of hallways in a variety of public buildings and offices, with exceptions being granted for the likes of hospitals, all in a desperate attempt to prevent the country from running out of gas. Even tap water in public buildings used for washing hands will no longer be allowed to be heated using a boiler over the winter months, while contract clauses legally mandating that landlords heat their buildings to a certain minimum for the sake of their tenants have also been suspended.

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