Orbán: Europe Must ‘Fight the Fundamentalist Greens’ to Fix Energy Crisis
You can quote several words to match them as a full term:
"some text to search"
otherwise, the single words will be understood as distinct search terms.
ANY of the entered words would match
3 min read

Orbán: Europe Must ‘Fight the Fundamentalist Greens’ to Fix Energy Crisis

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has said that Europe must “fight the fundamentalist greens” if it hopes to solve its energy crisis.
Orbán: Europe Must ‘Fight the Fundamentalist Greens’ to Fix Energy Crisis

In order to solve the ongoing energy crisis gripping the continent, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has said that Europe now needs to “fight the fundamentalist greens” to enable energy sources such as coal, nuclear and gas to be properly deployed. With the price of gas in particular spiking in recent weeks, the energy situation on the European continent is now looking especially dire, with one EU plan urging people to solve the crisis by using less energy branded “ridiculous” by one MEP within the bloc. Now, Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has called upon those residing in the continent to fight those who would resist the development of energy infrastructure in relation to fossil fuels and nuclear energy, something which the political leader seems to believe is now essential for the purpose of solving the ongoing crisis. “There are few continents in such a difficult situation as ours, but only our continent makes their own lives this much harder,” Orbán wrote in a post on social media, saying that Europe was self-sabotaging in regards to its energy policy for “political reasons”. Describing Europe as having run out of energy, the Prime Minister said it was now time to argue for the full spectrum of energy sources. “[W]e have to fight the fundamentalist greens and the bureaucrats involved in geopolitical games,” he also said. “They have to be convinced, and this argument is a real fight, so that different energy sources – coal, nuclear, gas – are not excluded [as] possibilities.” Orbán’s declaration against green agenda advocates stands in stark contrast with other leaders within the EU, many of whom have merely ordered their populations to use less energy as the bloc finds itself unable to replace now unavailable Russian gas. Many countries have opted to turn off decorative lights as well as reduce the maximum temperature buildings can be heated to, with it being suggested that France could even put the Eiffel Tower under rationing rules that would see its lighting turned off more than an hour earlier than usual. At the European level, Commission President Ursula von der Leyen has called for “mandatory rationing” in what she suggests would help “flatten the curve” of power usage at peak times. However, the plan has been outright mocked as “ridiculous” by at least one MEP within the union, with Alternative für Deutschland’s Markus Buchheit describing the call “a classic declaration of bankruptcy by the would-be EU government”. “I am at a loss for words in the face of this widespread misery,” the Identity and Democracy group politician said in a statement seen by Breitbart Europe. “I can only describe the specific emergency measures taken by the EU Commission as ridiculous.” Buchheit went on to deride von der Leyen’s call for “solidarity” between all EU member states, saying that such a call “didn’t work even during the Corona crisis”. Regardless of the effectiveness of EU measures aimed at tackling the crisis, Viktor Orbán wrote on Saturday that it was now certain that Hungary would have no issues with energy, with the country having recently agreed new contracts with Russia that actually boosts the amount of gas being supplied into the country. “I would like to make it clear that Hungary and the Hungarian government will do what is required by the homeland,” Orbán said. “We won’t have a shortage of energy,” he continued. “This is not a prediction, this is a statement of fact.

There will be gas and enough electricity in Hungary.” .

Read the full article at the original website

References: